TVC History


1980’s

  • TVC operated informally with meetings that included the participation of key stakeholders in the field of child mental health.  Tipper Gore chaired this group.
  • TVC was organized in 1986 by Tipper Gore as a statewide coalition of individuals, agencies, and organizations working together as a Steering Council to promote children’s mental health services.

 1990-1994

  • TVC sponsored a series of four public policy forums entitled, “Children’s Issues in the ’90’s.”
  • TVC became a not for profit 501(c)(3) organization with a Board of Directors and Advisory Council.
  • In September of 1993, Tipper Gore announced that TVC had received additional funding for a three year grant administered by the Federal Center for Mental Health Services to pursue the development and implementation of a Statewide Family Support Network for families with children impacted by emotional and behavioral difficulties.
  • At the end of 1993, Tipper Gore resigned as chair of TVC and Ann Ince assumed this role of the steering council and Lisa McInturf was hired as Executive Director.

 1995-1999

  • In 1995, Charlotte Bryson came on board as TVC’s Executive Director.
  • In 1996, TVC’s most powerful conference, “State of the Child” made its debut.  The three day conference is still held bi-annually and is dedicated to making a positive difference in the lives of Tennessee’s children.
  • In 1997, the Children’s Mental Health Week Celebration was held for the first time.  This week is designed for public awareness of children’s mental health issues and includes depression screening as well as a festival at the Nashville Zoo.
  • In 1998, TVC and the Regional Intervention program received a collaborative grant from the Frist Foundation for shared media and TVC’s library began.  Today, our library has over 3,000 resources covering over 75 topics for professionals and families to use.
  • In 1999, the Board of Directors members voted unanimously that the Board should be comprised of a minimum of 51% parents and family members whose lives are touched by emotional and behavioral disorders.  This step truly made TVC a family-driven organization.
  • Also in 1999, TVC received a $12 million dollar/six year grant for the Nashville Connection.  This program became one of the flagships of TVC’s work of bringing system of care to Tennessee.

  The 2000’s

  • Moving into the early 2000’s, TVC continued to grow.  TVC currently employs 35 full and part time employees.
  • TVC continues to present the biennial State of the Child conference while co-sponsoring others including the Youth Violence and Parenting as Prevention conferences.
  • TVC has implemented a Youth Council as a joint effort between the Statewide Family Support Network and the System of Care grants.
  • In 2005, TVC received the Claiming Children Award from the Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health.
  • In 2007, TVC purchased the 701 Bradford Ave. building in Nashville, TN.
  • TVC strives to meet its mission and goals by providing forums, conferences, education, and training to parents, professionals, policy makers, business and community leaders.
  • TVC is a contributing partner in the state’s efforts to develop and refine policy regarding children with mental health needs and their families.  TVC is a voting member of the Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities Mental Health Planning Council.
  • In 2008, TVC was awarded a contract from Memphis City Council to provide a neighborhood system of care program, JustCare 180, to divert children the court system; the program had a 90% success rate in preventing further youth involvement in juvenile court..
  • In 2011, TVC became the statewide chapter of Youth M.O.V.E. National.
  • In 2013, the World Premiere of Hear Our Voices:Transforming the Children’s Mental Health System took place at the Belcourt Theatre to a sold out crowd.
  • In 2013, Charlotte Bryson received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Federation of Families at their 2013 Conference.
  • In January of 2014, Charlotte Bryson retired as the executive Director of TVC.
  • In February of 2014, Rikki Harris was named Chief Executive Officer at TVC.  A position she currently holds.
  • TVC staff and family members are represented on the Mental Health Regional Planning Councils, the advisory boards of the original behavioral health organizations and the Children’s Committee of the Mental Health Planning Council.
  • TVC plays an active role on the Children’s Mental Health Council which is charged with implementing a statewide system of care for children with mental health needs.
  • TVC is a key partner in four SAMHSA funded System of Care Sites in Columbia, Memphis, Knoxville, and the Mid-Cumberland region of Middle Tennessee.